Share
A- A A+

Article from:

Creation  Volume 17Issue 2 Cover

Creation 17(2):51
March 1995

Free Email News
Creation magazine print - 1 yr new subn


US $25.00
View Item
The Creation Answers Book
by Various

US $9.00
View Item
frame top left frame top frame top right
frame left
Creation Magazine Volume 17 Issue 2 CoverFirst published:
Creation 17(2):51
March 1995
frame right
frame bottom leftframe bottomframe bottom right

World's oldest salt lake only a few thousand years old

by

In 1984, scientists measured the amount of salt accumulated in Australia's largest salt lake — Lake Eyre in South Australia. They found that it would have taken about 73,000 years to accumulate, assuming a flood occurred every 50 years.1

However, the South Australian National Parks and Wildlife Service in 1991 stated that 'almost all its area is covered on average once in 8 years.'2 This reduces the time period for accumulation to only 12,000 years. This has to be a maximum time because the fossil evidence suggests that inland Australia was much wetter in the past, being covered in rainforest during the Tertiary Period when the lake was supposedly formed. With flooding every year, as could have occurred in the past, the minimum time for accumulation would be 1,500 years.

Evolutionists date the Tertiary between two and 65 million years ago. Even if Lake Eyre formed two million years ago, and we assume floods every eight years, 99.4 per cent of the expected salt is missing. If we assume it is older, and take into account the wetter climate of the past, the problem becomes even greater, with up to 99.99 per cent of the expected salt missing.

The scientists who did the work were puzzled by this discrepancy and could find no explanation for where the salt could have gone.

However, if only several thousand years have elapsed since the Flood of Noah's time, as the Bible implies, then maybe all the salt is still there.

REFERENCES

  1. R.H. Gunn and P.M. Fleming, Australian Journal of Soil Research, Vol.22, 1984, pp. 119­134.

  2. Parkabout, National Parks and Wildlife Service of South Australia, Vol.1 No.6, Winter 1991.


You are probably accessing this site because you had questions—just like everyone else. That’s why CMI exists. You can help keep the free answers on this site coming. Support this site

Copied to clipboard
1738
Product added to cart.
Click store to checkout.
In your shopping cart

Remove All Products in Cart
Go to store and Checkout
Go to store
Total price does not include shipping costs. Prices subject to change in accordance with your country’s store.