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Page 10 of 25 (295 Articles)
Shrews eating peppers
Another example of a natural selection favouring an information-losing mutation, which is the opposite to that required for goo-to-you evolution.
by Jonathan Sarfati
Salad-eating sharks
Bonnethead sharks have short ‘carnivorous ancestry’ intestines, yet their stomachs have been found to contain up to 62% seagrass
by David Catchpoole
Stuart Burgess wins the 2019 James Clayton Prize
Creationists are often accused of bad science or worse but a multiple award-winning, world-class engineer keeps putting the lie to these claims.
by Philip Bell
Facing up to design
Our incredible facial expressivity—able to represent 21 distinct emotions—would appear to be overdesigned.
by David Catchpoole
Black butterfly wings inspire solar cell design
Solar cell modelled on butterfly wing absorbs twice as much sunlight
by Jonathan Sarfati
An eggcellent design
Eggshell nanostructure shows purposeful construction
by Phil Robinson
Pigeon Revision: Brainy birds trump bookish baboons
The ability to distinguish the style of a Picasso from a Monet puts a whole new perspective on ‘bird-brainy’
by David Catchpoole
Unmasking natural selection
A review of ‘40 Years of Evolution: Darwin’s finches on Daphne Major Island’ by Peter and Rosemary Grant.
by Jean K. Lightner
Blue eyes mutation
Many people of European descent have less melanin in their eyes, and it’s got nothing to do with evolution
by David Catchpoole and Robert Carter
The albatross—master aviator of the ocean winds
Powered by ocean wind shear, the dynamic soaring of the albatross enables it to fly for thousands of miles just above the sea surface without flapping its wings.
by David Catchpoole
Creationist modelling of the origins of Canis lupus familiaris—ancestry, timing, and biogeography
When and how did dogs diversify after Noah’s Flood?
by Cody J. Guitard
We are less than dust
Everything we see is mostly made up of empty space
by Robert Carter