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Page 21 of 31 (366 Articles)
Beavers—aquatic architects
Famous for their dam-building, beavers have their own built-in ‘goggles’ to see clearly underwater.
by Denis Dreves
The Mole
Whether you love them or hate them (ugh, those molehills!), moles are testimony to a Creator.
by Paula Weston and Carl Wieland
Is the dog’s ‘collar bone’ vestigial?
The dog’s shoulder is a brilliant design, in spite of evolutionary teaching to the contrary.
by Philip Bell
Surprise, surprise—box jellyfish eyes
The lowly, ‘basal’ box jellyfish has astonished scientists with its capacity to see things above the water.
by David Catchpoole
Bats—sophistication in miniature
For the amazing echolocation ability of bats to function properly, both emitting and receiving organs must be present, and cooperate. (There are other problems too, to drive evolutionists ‘batty’.)
by Paula Weston
Homology made simple
Does common anatomy necessarily point to common ancestry?
by Dominic Statham
Australia’s amazing kangaroos and the birth of their young
Kangaroos—created or evolved? The complexity, variety and beauty of God’s creatures serve to glorify the Creator and show His power.
by Andrew A. Snelling
Why a butterfly flutters by
Some might think that the butterfly, with its jerky fluttering flight, is a ‘primitive’ and inefficient flyer. Actually, their complicated wing movements generate more lift than simple flapping would do.
by David Catchpoole
Beetles … nature's workaholics
You can find beetles in almost any habitat occupied by other insects, munching on anything from snails to dung!
by Paula Weston
Slimy secrets
What has one foot, is small, and can go over anything? (Hint: it has a wonderfully slick method of locomotion!)
by David Catchpoole, Australia
The way of the woodpecker
Engineers wonder at the woodpecker’s resilience to head-banging—and copy it.
by David Catchpoole
DVD makers copy mantis shrimp eye design
The fine nanorod structure of the mantis shrimp eyes allow it to rotate the polarization across the spectrum. This could help DVD players to process much more information.
by Jonathan Sarfati