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Page 23 of 31 (366 Articles)
Facing up to design
Our incredible facial expressivity—able to represent 21 distinct emotions—would appear to be overdesigned.
by David Catchpoole
Over-engineering in nature: an evolutionary conundrum
Natural selection can only select for the attributes an organism needs to survive, so how is it that creatures are endowed with a whole lot more than necessary?
by David Catchpoole
Coral: The animal that acts like a plant, but is an active predator, and makes its own rocks for a house
The sea creature that makes so much of an impression, its effects can be seen from outer space.
by Rob Carter
Nature’s self-cleaning marvels: Who did the Research & Development?
Nobody saw her “billions of years of research and development”, yet ‘she’ is credited with nature’s marvels of engineering.
by David Catchpoole
Fingernails and toenails—useless evolutionary relics or an important part of design?
Are they useless evolutionary relics, or important part of design?
by Jerry Bergman
Fish scales inspire flexible armoured gloves
Water dwellers have intricate design features that can be mimicked to help build better protective gear.
by Jonathan Sarfati
The peacock spider
A tiny, amazing, colourful arachnid ‘struts’ around like the bird after which it is named.
by Michael Eggleton
Does Leviticus 19:19 prohibit the cross-breeding of horses and donkeys?
Does Leviticus 19:19 prohibit the cross-breeding of horses and donkeys?
by Joel Tay
The atlatl (woomera) and the heron’s neck
Sneak peek of latest Creation magazine. Some have speculated that the idea of atlatl-assisted spearthrowing came from watching herons hunt.
by Jon Ahlquist and David Catchpoole
Pre-Fall seafood
What fish ate before the Fall
by Keaton Halley
The wily coyote—dogged by reputation, this coy ‘wolf’ continues to surprise
Does the reviled coyote deserve its reputation?
by David Catchpoole
Mutant plastic-munching enzyme does not support evolution
New plastic-munching Ideonella sakaiensis bacterium was intelligently engineered, not randomly evolved.
by Ari Takku