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Flood-buried crocodile’s last supper was a dinosaur
Did a crocodile ambush an ornithopod dinosaur to eat it, or did it venture upon a fortunate last supper (already dead), before it got buried in the Flood?
by Lucien Tuinstra
The firewalkers
Surrounded by fiery lava and floodwaters, animals left their mark
by Jonathan obrien
Biggest ichthyosaur ever found in the UK!
The largest and most complete fossil ichthyosaur skeleton ever found in the UK is best explained as evidence of catastrophic burial during the Flood.
by Gavin Cox
Mightiest, 'multi-million-year-old' millipede
A newly discovered fossil of Arthropleura, a giant millipede, provides good evidence of having been buried during Noah’s Flood.
by Gavin Cox
Trilobite conga line vs evolutionary timeline
Amazingly preserved trilobite fossils testify to rapid fossil formation during Noah’s Flood
by Philip Robinson
T. rex dinosaur relatives found buried together
Did T. rex relatives live and die together, or are the scientists right that these Teratophoneus fossils were buried together in a flood?
by Lucien Tuinstra
‘Billion-year’ fossil ‘balls’ (part 1)
Balls of cells discovered in ancient rocks pushes back complexity and multi-cellularity to supposedly one billion years ago. Such evidence fits early biblical history far better than evolution.
by Gavin Cox
Candles turned to stone
Found deep in a mine, they help demonstrate the length of time needed to turn buried animal and plant remains into rock
by Jonathan O’Brien
Ammonite in amber
A sea creature found trapped in resin from a land tree
by Phil Robinson
Where are the fossils of buildings and artifacts from pre-Flood civilizations?
If the geologic strata were deposited by a global Flood, why aren’t there pre-Flood tools and buildings in the fossil record?
by Keaton Halley, Shaun Doyle
The Salt Range saga
The Salt Range of Pakistan has yielded some very interesting fossils—that according to evolution should not have been found!
by Paul Price
A painting 95 million years in the making
Did octopus fossil ink really survive millions of years?
by Phil Robinson