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Page 5 of 7 (75 Articles)
Cladistics, evolution and the fossils
How are all those nicely presented evolutionary trees put together? Do they really demonstrate evolution?
by Shaun Doyle
Horsetails are ‘living fossils’!
Long familiar to keen gardeners, horsetails are ‘living fossils’, unchanged from their supposedly ‘prehistoric’ ancestors.
by David Catchpoole
Living fossil ray riddle
A living Shovelnose Ray is almost identical to a ‘dinosaur era’ fossil ray, a living fossil, challenging both evolution and geological time.
by no author
Further expansion of evolutionary fossil time ranges
More confusion and contradiction in the evolutionary story about the fossils.
by Michael Oard
Living fossils and ‘junk DNA’
Why do ‘living fossils’ and functions in ‘junk DNA’ present problems for evolution?
by Don Batten, Lita Cosner
Evolution exams and fossil fallacies
How to answer questions about evolution: whether for course credit or to clear up misconceptions about fossils
by Shaun Doyle, Jonathan Srafati
Is the famous fish-fossil finished?
Tiktaalik, the transitional star, faces an evolutionary dead-end
by Tas Walker
Pollen Paradox
Evolutionists have ‘allergic’ reaction to Precambrian pollen—South American fossils more than a billion years ‘out of date’
by Emil Silvestru and Carl Wieland
Fossils in the wrong place?
Yes and no!
by Michael Oard
Living fossils: a powerful argument for creation
Sneak peek of latest Creation magazine. Dr Carl Werner discovered that the world’s museums contain fossils of many of today’s creatures, but found in ‘dinosaur’ rock. Why aren’t these fossils on display?
by Don Batten
Fascinating fossil fence-wire
Unfortunately, the average person is still conditioned into thinking ‘millions of years’ when considering how rocks and fossils form. But as we’ve said many times with many examples—given the right conditions, rocks and fossils will form in a very short time.
by not in article
‘Oldest’ fossil shrimp?
How is an old fossil shrimp important for unraveling evolution if it closely resembles modern shrimp?
by Shaun Doyle