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Page 6 of 10 (117 Articles)
Much supposed geological time missing from strata
Deep time is more gap than rock record
by Michael Oard
Stone Mountain, Georgia (USA)
How a catastrophic event helped form an astonishing feature in Georgia’s landscape.
by Tas Walker
Long-distance boulder deposits reveal Noah’s Flood
When rocks are found great distances from their place of origin, what explanation best fits such an occurrence?
by Michael Oard
How many impact craters should there be on the earth?
Does the moon give us enough clues to estimate how many asteroids impacted the earth.
by Michael J. Oard
Recessive Stage of Flood began in the mid-Cretaceous and eroded kilometres of sediment from continent
The geology of south-west Western Australia interpreted from a biblical perspective.
by Tas Walker
The ‘Great Unconformity’ and associated geochemical evidence for Noahic Flood erosion
Only a catastrophic flood can account for the world’s largest and most intriguing geological feature.
by Harry Dickens
The uniformitarian puzzle of mountaintop planation surfaces
Uniformitarian scientists cannot explain how planation surfaces exist throughout the world, but the evidence clearly points to the biblical Flood.
by Michael J. Oard
The Grand Canyon in the thralls of shallow, doctrinaire uniformitarianism
Uncritical rehash of the same set of old arguments that are imagined to nullify Flood geology.
by John Woodmorappe
Changing paradigms in stratigraphy—“a quite different way of analyzing the record”
Understanding the earth’s geological record is undergoing a radical rethink.
by John K. Reed
Did a lake exist under the north-western Laurentide Ice Sheet?
Do sediment cores from Canada’s Great Slave Lake give support to such an idea?
by Michael J. Oard
Coastal great escarpments caused by Flood runoff
On various continents, escarpments stand as a testimony to enormous geological forces.
by Michael J Oard
The Appalachian Mountains are young
The receding waters of Noah’s Flood better explain what shaped geological features such as mountains, valleys and rivers.
by Michael J.Oard