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Page 7 of 9 (97 Articles)
Soil formation and the age of the earth
Soil formation is often invoked as a death blow to the historical reliability of the Bible and justify evolution over millions of years.
by Tas Walker
Many arches and natural bridges likely from the Flood
The origin of these spectacular landforms is an enigma for long-age geology.
by Michael J. Oard
Mineral evolution
What’s next? Geobiology or biogeology?
by Emil Silvestru
Sandy surprise
When most people look at huge sandstone cliffs, for example, they are conditioned in today’s culture to think in terms of millions of years. But this swimming pool owner, from hard experience, knows you don’t need the millions of years.
by n/a
A river like no other
On Charles Darwin’s Beagle voyage, his geological observations using Charles Lyell’s book reinforced his belief in long ages, and underpinned his later evolutionary ideas. But modern geology denies many of his interpretations.
by Emil Silvestru
St Hutton’s Hagiography
James Hutton: the pioneering founder of uniformitarian geology? Was he the bold empiricist and rational thinker, who cast aside biblical superstition. Or was this hagiographic revisionism from Playfair and Lyell.
by John Reid
Wild, wild floods!
Two catastrophic floods were responsible for separating the British Isles from Continental Europe.
by Emil Silvestru
Surtsey still surprises
This island with canyons, rounded boulders and a ‘fully functional ecosystem’ has been described as ‘astonishing’. Why? It’s only 45 years old!
by David Catchpoole
Granite formation: catastrophic in its suddenness
Catastrophic in its suddenness.
by Tas Walker
The age of the Jenolan Caves, Australia
The long and tortuous uniformitarian history for these caves is riddled with difficulties.
by Emil Silvestru
Do rivers erode through mountains?
Have you ever noticed that many of the world’s rivers flow through mountain ranges rather than around them?
by Michael Oard
Mud experiments overturn long-held geological beliefs
A call for a radical reappraisal of all previous interpretations of mudstone deposits
by Tas Walker