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Time: The Great Enabler
Evolution relies on deep time which in turn relies on naturalism but science tells us the earth is young and so evolution is false.
by Robert Carter
Soil, trees and their fruit
The Lord Jesus told us that certain trees will produce certain fruit. Gary Bates uses this analogy to show the importance of Genesis creation for our worldviews.
by Gary Bates
On holy ground? A creationist in Darwin’s home
Is the famous residence of Charles Darwin a science museum or a shrine that propagates a secular, godless worldview?
by Thomas Fretwell
How do miracles happen?
Do we need to know how miracles happen to know if they happen?
by Shaun Doyle
Wishful thinking about nature’s abilities
Many believers in nature’s capacity for evolutionary innovation think the sky’s the limit—yet their allegedly ‘naturalistic science’ writings betray a faith in the abilities of ‘Nature’ that borders on paganism.
by Philip Bell
Where materialism logically leads
When scientists—particularly physicists—look at the universe and rule out the Creator, it inevitably leads them down a dark path to confusion.
by John G Hartnett
Monkey minds
If our minds were undesigned, accidental byproducts of evolution, why would we trust them?
by Keaton Halley
Mind over matter
A naturalistic view of origins must explain the existence of coded information within living things arising from a ‘no mind’ process, but all of our scientific observations deny that possibility.
by Calvin Smith
Agnosticism
What is agnosticism? And how can Christians respond to it?
by Shaun Doyle
Precambrian rabbits—death knell for evolution?
Richard Dawkins says a rabbit fossil in the Precambrian would be evidence against evolution, but would that really be the case?
by Shaun Doyle
Worldviews, logic, and earth’s age—part 2
Deep-time compromise has had a negative effect on the Christian church despite claims to the contrary.
by John K. Reed and Shaun Doyle
The bad tree of evolution
Rotten from the roots to the fruits.
by Robert Gurney