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Page 5 of 10 (119 Articles)
Australia’s Aborigines … did they see dinosaurs?
Eyewitness testimony from native peoples leaves no doubt that they lived with creatures which today we know as dinosaurs.
by Rebecca Driver
The Grand Canyon in the thralls of shallow, doctrinaire uniformitarianism
Uncritical rehash of the same set of old arguments that are imagined to nullify Flood geology.
by John Woodmorappe
Did a lake exist under the north-western Laurentide Ice Sheet?
Do sediment cores from Canada’s Great Slave Lake give support to such an idea?
by Michael J. Oard
Learning the lessons of Mount St Helens
The catastrophic event that revealed how wrongly geologists understood and explained volcanic landscapes.
by Tas Walker
DNA research says Australian Aborigines arrived 50,000 years ago
But how reliable are the ‘molecular clocks’?
by Tas Walker
Amazing armoured armadillos of the Americas
This mammal with a leathery armour was once rare in Texas, but its ‘conquest’ of that state—and beyond—conveys a strong message.
by Lael Weinberger
The age of the Jenolan Caves, Australia
The long and tortuous uniformitarian history for these caves is riddled with difficulties.
by Emil Silvestru
Post-Flood log mats potentially can explain biogeography
Animals dispersing around the world by either land bridges or rafting is accepted by both creationists and secularists.
by Michael J Oard
Canyon creation
Fast-forming canyons show that textbook pictures of slow and gradual processes are really just storytelling.
by Rebecca Gibson
The Ark Van ministry
Travelling Australia and the world beyond talking about Noah and the Ark.
by N/A
Warm early Eocene Antarctica
There was a time when one of the world’s coldest and iciest regions was much warmer.
by Michael J Oard
Fossil snakes and the Flood boundary in North America
In trying to determine the boundary between Flood and post-Flood deposits, help may come from an unexpected and slithery source.
by Chad Arment