Explore
communism-and-nazism
Back to Topics
Page 1 of 2 (21 Articles)
The deep and undeniable Darwinian roots of Nazi eugenics
A review of Darwinian Eugenics and the Holocaust by Jerry Bergman.
by John Woodmorappe
The central role of Darwinism in the Holocaust
How the German academic culture contributed to the genocide of European Jews during World War II
by Jerry Bergman
In an ocean of lies, the truth is our anchor
When lies and fake news are abundant, it becomes hard to discern the truth. The Bible is the book that not only points to the truth, but is the truth.
by Lucien Tuinstra
Hitler the evolutionist; Hitler the pantheist (Hitler the atheist—Yes)
What was Hitler’s worldview? A review of Hitler’s religion by Richard Weikart
by John Woodmorappe
Nazi child euthanasia and Hans Asperger
A new study shows that Hans Asperger actively assisted the Nazi eugenics policies.
by Russell Grigg
Darwinism has remade Western society—for the worse
A look at how evolutionary thinking has impacted society far beyond the scientific realm.
by John Woodmorappe
World War 1 centenary
New video clip about the evolutionary origins of World War 1, which were the precursors of WW2 and the Nazi Holocaust.
by Jonathan Sarfati
The Christian Nazi myth refuted
A review of: The Swastika against the Cross: The Nazi War on Christianity by Bruce Walker
by Lita Sanders
Namibian genocide—a precursor of the Holocaust
A Review of The Kaiser’s Holocaust: Germany’s Forgotten Genocide and the Colonial Roots of Nazism by David Olusoga and Casper W. Erichsen
by Marc Ambler
Darwinism and World War One
While the Second World War is more obviously connected to Darwinism, it also played an important role in the first.
by Lita Sanders
The lies of Lynchburg
Enthusiastic disciples of Darwin formulated eugenics laws in America to prevent ‘undesirables’ from breeding—well before the Nazi ‘racial hygiene’ policies.
by Carl Wieland
The Darwinian roots of the Nazi legal system
Nazis were Darwinists so they did not accept the idea of God-ordained human rights. Instead, they believed that the ‘stronger’ would have the ‘right’ to dispossess and destroy the ‘weaker’.
by Augusto Zimmermann