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Page 9 of 11 (122 Articles)
The use of Genesis in the New Testament
Why should New Testament scholars care about the interpretation of Genesis? Because the New Testament quotes it frequently—as history!
by Lita Sanders
Who was the serpent?
Did a snake really speak to Eve?
by Russell Grigg
Using the Bible to prove the Bible?
Jesus’ words break the circle.
by Jonathan Sarfati
Politicizing Scripture
When politics becomes the measure for a Bible translation, it is a perversion of Scripture, no matter whose politics are involved.
by Lita Sanders
Augustine young earth creationist
Those who want to fit deep time into the Bible often cite Augustine in support. However, Augustine was a young earth creationist, as a scholar of Augustine’s works reveals.
by Prof. Benno Zuiddam
The ‘gender neutral’ Bible
‘Inclusive’ versions of the Bible distort the message of Scripture to avoid being offensive.
by Lita Sanders
Romans 5:12–21: Paul’s view of literal Adam
Many passages in Scripture require Adam to be historical. Among them is Romans 5:12–21, where a historical Adam is contrasted with the historical Jesus.
by Lita Sanders
Roman Catholicism and Genesis
A Roman Catholic priest and Ph.D. physicist shows how biblical creation was the traditional view of the Church Fathers and medieval Church Doctors and makes sense of science.
by Michael Oard
Gospel Dates and Reliability
When were the Gospels written? How long was this after the events they record? Should they be trusted if they were written decades later?
by Lita Sanders
What should we think of new or trendy Bible translations?
How far should Bible translators go to accommodate their proposed readers? Some important biblical principles are explained.
by James Patrick Holding
Why Genesis 5 is a key chapter in the Bible
The chronology of the genealogy in Genesis 5 ties Creation week to the subsequent events, strongly authenticating the real history of Genesis 1–11.
by Paul A. Hansen
What’s in a pronoun? The divine gender controversy
A number of respondents to a UK survey disagreed with a ‘male God’. But what does the Bible teach, and what does it mean for people of both sexes?
by Lita Sanders