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Two-tone twins

Photo by Gary Roberts, . Twins

Believe it or not, these two beautiful little girls are twins. Born in April 2005 in Nottingham, UK, blue-eyed Remee (on the left in photo at left) would be called ‘white’, while many would label her brown-eyed sister, Kian, as ‘black’.1

The twins soon became the focus of much media attention. News reports described how both of their parents (photo below), Kylie Hodgson and Remi Horder, ‘have white mothers and black fathers.’2

These two little girls help answer one of the questions that has troubled many people about the Bible. If there was just one man and one woman at the beginning then where did all the ‘races’ come from, with their ‘different skin colours’? Remee and Kian prove that it is simply a matter of genetics—with the right genes, all the different complexions can appear in one generation.3

Photo by Gary Roberts, . Family

So if Adam and Eve had a middle-brown complexion due to a mixture of ‘light’ and ‘dark’ genetic information, similar to Remee and Kian’s parents, all shades from the darkest through to the lightest could be accounted for in their children and future generations.

Kian and Remee also illustrate the biblical truth that we are all related—we all belong to the same family through Adam and Eve, and through Noah and his family too, just as the Bible says.

References

  1. Laing, L., Twins in a million, The Sunday Mail (Brisbane), 12 March 2006, p. 3. Return to text.
  2. ABC News, One twin’s white, the other’s black—twins’ parents both have white mothers, black fathers, abcnews.go.com/GMA/story?id=1813509, 19 September 2006. Return to text.
  3. The pigment responsible for skin ‘colour’ is melanin. If we have a lot of this pigment we are very dark (‘black’). If we don’t have much of this pigment our complexion will be fair (‘white’). See The Creation Answers Book, chapter 18: ‘How did the different “races” arise?’, Creation Ministries International, Brisbane, Australia, 2006. Return to text.